Wherever I Wind Up

I have recently finished reading, Mets starting pitcher, R.A. Dickey’s memoir. What a great read it was and during my college years I was not known to be a reader. Maybe it’s different when you choose to read up on subjects that interest yourself, rather than being forced to read material of a professor’s choosing. If you’re not a baseball fan this book is still for you. If you’re not a Mets fan this book is still for you. If you think that you have struggled in life this book is for you. If you want to know what adversity truly is and a way for you to handle it is, well then this book is for you too.

R.A. Dickey, born Robert Allen Dickey, is not an overnight success story. He’s not even close. He comes clean about several “demons” he has faced in his life. If you are at all familiar with this book, R.A. Dickey, or heard about his tribulations, you know that R.A. Dickey was molested by a 13-year-old babysitter and a 17-year-old male. He held that secret in for decades before telling anyone. This has nothing to do with baseball and everything to do with life and the inhumane feelings a young boy felt. He was robbed of his innocence. He grew up in a home where his parents were separated and his mother battled alcohol problems. He cheated on his wife and as an adult he had thoughts of suicide because of how he deeply felt like a failure. He one day he tried to swim across the Missouri River. Half way through his swim he thought he wasn’t going to make it and drown right there. He went under and bounced off the ground before paddling his way to the side. It was at this moment R.A. Dickey felt like he was reborn, like he had just been baptized, ready to start anew. On the mound today R.A. Dickey doesn’t appear to have battled any of this, but he battled so much more.

R.A. Dickey was a star athlete in basketball, baseball, and football. He played point guard and quarterback in high school. He was probably a better pitcher than anything else and that’s what he pursued. He attended the University of Tennessee and majored in english. He was a student there the same time that Todd Helton and Peyton Manning attended. Those two have been household names for over a decade. R.A. Dickey is barely a household name now, but it almost seems like he just broke on the scene. He was drafted in 1996 by the Texas Rangers. He received an offer for $810,000 before the team and Dr. Andrews found out that he didn’t have a UCL (Ulnar Collateral Ligament). Then rescinded their offer and later offered him a measly $75,000. Remember Dickey was one of the top prospects coming into the draft. He was drafted in 1996 and didn’t make an MLB appearance until 2001. His first start was record-breaking, only in the way that you don’t want to be remembered for. He had allowed 6 long balls in just three innings. Dickey referred to himself as a four-A pitcher, meaning he was too good for Triple-A but not good enough for the Majors. He was starting to rack up records in the minor leagues which isn’t a good thing. It meant that he had spent too much time there.

I don’t want to give too much of the book away, but it was a great read. It is inspiring to know that someone who was thought to be a phenom and then a reject could persevere. He overcame great hardships as a young boy. He found God and his way into the Majors. He fought persistently to realize his dream. Dickey’s story is inspiring to anybody that has doubts about achieving their dreams. His long journey finally came to fruition at an age in baseball, particularly for pitchers, where it’s just about time to hang it up. Fortunately for Dickey, his knuckleball, will add years of life to his career and let him enjoy the moments he dreamed of his whole life.

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